A healthy mix of philosophical awe and ridiculous humor~

This blog contains the following (Click each for the link!):

#SCIENCE

#Food

#Cute Stuff

#Funny Stuff

#Art

#Music

#Cats

#Pandas

#GLBT

#Doctor Who

#Sherlock

And anything else that catches my eye ;D

About Me:

James, 23, Oklahoma, Medical Technologist in Chemistry (ASCP), Part-Time Panda

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Randomness of a Teenage Wannabe Chef.. with 2,269 notes

biomorphosis:

Raccoon dogs look very similar to raccoons but have no genetic similarities between them. They belong to belong to the Canidae family, which are known to have distinct dog and wolf like characteristics and appearance. These animals are both carnivorous and omnivorous mammals.

They are monogamous and will mate for life. It is only if the mate dies or is killed, will the other search for a new mate. Two mates will hibernate in one den. During this period they will maintain close body contact to keep each other warm and will groom each other as well. This is a trait not practiced by canines, as dogs neither hibernate and nor are they monogamous in nature.

aka tanuki, as in from Morenatsu!!

Tagged: animalsMorenatsu

Source: biomorphosis

17th May 2014

Photoset reblogged from CAM CARTOON FANATIC with 5,531 notes

buggirl:

I am so very excited to share this story with you as it was one of those rare treats in life where I realize how lucky I was to witness this animal in the wild. 

This is a male pinocchio anole, Anolis proboscis.  Until recently it was thought to be extinct until some people found it near the small town of Mindo, Ecuador.  While we were in the rainforest near Mindo, we decided to look for it just for shits and giggles.  We did not expect to find it.  One, it’s one of the rarest lizards in the world, and two, it hangs out in the top of the canopy.  We were just poking around in a yard type area near a road when my herpetologist friend, Leah, started screaming “I found one!!”. He was just sitting there near the side of a road in a bush.  Just right there within reach, an animal thought to be completely wiped off the planet!  We had a little photo shoot with the rare animal then returned him to the leaf he was lazily resting on.   It was quite an experience.  After returning to camp, one of the biologists contacted her friend who wrote the book “Reptiles of Mindo” and he told her we were of only a few hundred people in the world who have encountered this animal!  What a treat!

You may read more about the Pinocchio Lizard here.

Tagged: biologyanimalsscience

Source: buggirl

7th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from Memewhore with 617,344 notes

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

haleydawnmarie:

sizvideos:

TL;DR : Watch this incredible story in video

Wow

leopard seals are basically big vicious water cats

Tagged: animals

Source: sizvideos

5th February 2014

Photoset reblogged from As Ignorant As I Get with 135,872 notes

slightly-bovverd:

papervaglife:

ugly-privilege:

beben-eleben:

Collective names for some animals

dumbfounded a murder of crows isn’t on here.

my english told me that a group of unicorns is called a blessing and thats the most beautiful thing I’ve ever heard

Why isn’t a grumble of pugs on this

Tagged: animals

Source: beben-eleben

12th November 2013

Photoset reblogged from As Ignorant As I Get with 14,001 notes

tookmyworldwithyou:

THIS IS THE BEST ADVERT EVER. YOU WILL CRY SO MUCH (x)

The Bear & The Hare - John Lewis (click here)

Tagged: Christmasanimalscutevideo

Source: tookmyworldwithyou

1st July 2013

Photo reblogged from What have you got to be afraid of? with 20,888 notes

captainsway:

anthropomorphia:


HUGE NEWS !!! We’ve Decoded Prairie Dog Language!Prairie dogs can say things as complex as: “Tall, thin, human wearing a blue shirt walking slowly across our colony.”
Dr. Con Slobidchikoff has shown that prairie dogs have words for different, specific threats, including distinct terms for coyote, dog, human, badger, and red-tailed hawk. The prairie dogs then react to these words by using different escape behaviours in response to the different predator names.
Their language includes components we use - nouns, adjectives and dialects.
They can also communicate about abstract ideas, like things that are not actually present, and they can describe abstract shapes, like circles and triangles.
They also have the ability to construct new words referring to novel objects or animals in their environment - prior to this study, only humans were recognized to have this ability.
If this has moved you, consider giving a helping hand to the Prairie Dog Coalition, and definitely check out Dr. Con!


http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2013/06/21/science-prairie-dog-language-decoded.html

captainsway:

anthropomorphia:

HUGE NEWS !!! 
We’ve Decoded Prairie Dog Language!

Prairie dogs can say things as complex as: “Tall, thin, human wearing a blue shirt walking slowly across our colony.”


Dr. Con Slobidchikoff has shown that prairie dogs have words for different, specific threats, including distinct terms for coyote, dog, human, badger, and red-tailed hawk. The prairie dogs then react to these words by using different escape behaviours in response to the different predator names.

  • Their language includes components we use - nouns, adjectives and dialects.
  • They can also communicate about abstract ideas, like things that are not actually present, and they can describe abstract shapes, like circles and triangles.
  • They also have the ability to construct new words referring to novel objects or animals in their environment - prior to this study, only humans were recognized to have this ability.


If this has moved you, consider giving a helping hand to the Prairie Dog Coalition, and definitely check out Dr. Con!

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2013/06/21/science-prairie-dog-language-decoded.html

Tagged: animalssciencelanguage

Source: consciouscreature

9th May 2013

Photoset reblogged from What have you got to be afraid of? with 11,749 notes

Tagged: artanimals

Source: fer1972

3rd May 2013

Photo reblogged from The Randomness of a Teenage Wannabe Chef.. with 859 notes

theurbanfoxwatcher:

thegreenwolf:

In short, leave those bunnies alone! Same thing with baby deer. However, baby birds can safely be put back in their nests—or if you can’t reach the nest, securely zip-tie (or otherwise fasten without nails so you don’t hurt the tree) an empty plastic butter container (like the small Country Crock ones) with some nesting material in it as high as you can to the tree the nest is in and put the baby in there. Often the parents will visit both nests. 
If you do find baby animals where you know the mother/parents are dead/not coming back/have abandoned the baby, PLEASE take the babies to the nearest wildlife rehab center. This includes squirrels, raccoons, etc. as well as the above. Yes, I know there are stories of “I raised these baby squirrels and they turned out just fine! They even come and visit me!” However, most people don’t manage to care for the wild critters well enough and the animals end up malnourished, sick, or dead. (Fun fact: did you know baby rabbits eat their mother’s droppings to get necessary bacterial components to build their immune systems?)
A wildlife rehab is simply a better place with more resources and training, and additionally they focus on minimizing human contact enough that the animals that can be released back into the wild will be less likely to equate humans with “source of food”, which never goes well for the animal. 

Same with foxes! Unless you know for certain that the mother is dead then leave them alone. Every year large numbers of cubs are taken from the wild when they shouldn’t have been. The vixen does not stay with the cubs during most of the day and its normal to see cubs wondering about alone! The vixen will usually be resting up somewhere nearby, so unless the cubs appear to be starving/dehydrated then they are probably fine!
Also remember that foxes often live in family groups and it’s not uncommon for the main vixen’s daughter/sister to step in and care for the cubs if anything should happen to her. Once the cubs are past the weaning stage they can survive without the mother so long as the father is around to bring them food. It’s also recommended in such situations that food is left at the den daily to help out. This is a much better situation for the cubs then taking them out of the wild.
Sadly the vast majority of cubs that have been rehabilitated in captivity die within the first few days/weeks of release. Cubs have a much higher chance of survival if they grow up in the wild where they belong.

theurbanfoxwatcher:

thegreenwolf:

In short, leave those bunnies alone! Same thing with baby deer. However, baby birds can safely be put back in their nests—or if you can’t reach the nest, securely zip-tie (or otherwise fasten without nails so you don’t hurt the tree) an empty plastic butter container (like the small Country Crock ones) with some nesting material in it as high as you can to the tree the nest is in and put the baby in there. Often the parents will visit both nests. 

If you do find baby animals where you know the mother/parents are dead/not coming back/have abandoned the baby, PLEASE take the babies to the nearest wildlife rehab center. This includes squirrels, raccoons, etc. as well as the above. Yes, I know there are stories of “I raised these baby squirrels and they turned out just fine! They even come and visit me!” However, most people don’t manage to care for the wild critters well enough and the animals end up malnourished, sick, or dead. (Fun fact: did you know baby rabbits eat their mother’s droppings to get necessary bacterial components to build their immune systems?)

A wildlife rehab is simply a better place with more resources and training, and additionally they focus on minimizing human contact enough that the animals that can be released back into the wild will be less likely to equate humans with “source of food”, which never goes well for the animal. 

Same with foxes! Unless you know for certain that the mother is dead then leave them alone. Every year large numbers of cubs are taken from the wild when they shouldn’t have been. The vixen does not stay with the cubs during most of the day and its normal to see cubs wondering about alone! The vixen will usually be resting up somewhere nearby, so unless the cubs appear to be starving/dehydrated then they are probably fine!

Also remember that foxes often live in family groups and it’s not uncommon for the main vixen’s daughter/sister to step in and care for the cubs if anything should happen to her. Once the cubs are past the weaning stage they can survive without the mother so long as the father is around to bring them food. It’s also recommended in such situations that food is left at the den daily to help out. This is a much better situation for the cubs then taking them out of the wild.

Sadly the vast majority of cubs that have been rehabilitated in captivity die within the first few days/weeks of release. Cubs have a much higher chance of survival if they grow up in the wild where they belong.

Tagged: babiesanimals

Source: thegreenwolf

27th January 2013

Photoset reblogged from Quantumaniac with 175 notes

quantumaniac:

Surprising Scientific Facts

1. There are 62,000 miles of blood vessels in the human body – laid end to end they would circle the earth 2.5 times

2. At over 2000 kilometers long, The Great Barrier Reef is the largest living structure on Earth

3. The risk of being struck by a falling meteorite for a human is one occurrence every 9,300 years

4. A thimbleful of a neutron star would weigh over 100 million tons

5. A typical hurricane produces the energy equivalent of 8,000 one megaton bombs

6. Blood sucking hookworms inhabit 700 million people worldwide

7. The highest speed ever achieved on a bicycle is 166.94 mph, by Fred Rompelberg

8. We can produce laser light a million times brighter than sunshine

9. 65% of those with autism are left handed

10. The combined length of the roots of a Finnish pine tree is over 30 miles

11. The oceans contain enough salt to cover all the continents to a depth of nearly 500 feet

12. The interstellar gas cloud Sagittarius B contains a billion, billion, billion liters of alcohol [JFrater is planning to move there in the near future]

13. Polar Bears can run at 25 miles an hour and jump over 6 feet in the air

14. 60-65 million years ago dolphins and humans shared a common ancestor

15. Polar Bears are nearly undetectable by infrared cameras, due to their transparent fur

16. The average person accidentally eats 430 bugs each year of their life

17. A single rye plant can spread up to 400 miles of roots underground

18. The temperature on the surface of Mercury exceeds 430 degrees C during the day, and, at night, plummets to minus 180 degrees centigrade

19. The evaporation from a large oak or beech tree is from ten to twenty-five gallons in twenty-four hours

20. Butterflies taste with their hind feet, and their taste sensation works on touch – this allows them to determine whether a leaf is edible.

Source

Tagged: animalsearthfacts

20th January 2013

Photo reblogged from The Randomness of a Teenage Wannabe Chef.. with 257,571 notes

keystonecougar:

wearemagnetised:

hamandheroin:

The Animal Rescue Site is having trouble getting enough people to click on it daily so they can meet their quota of getting FREE FOOD donated every day to abused and neglected animals in their shelters.
It takes less than a minute (only about 15 seconds actually) to go to their site and click on the purple box titled, ‘Click Here to Give - it’s FREE!’. Every click gives about .6 bowls of food to sheltered dogs. You can also click daily!
Keep in mind that this does not cost you a thing. Their corporate sponsors/advertisers use the number of daily visits to donate food to abandoned/neglected animals in exchange for advertising. [via.]
Go to the website here.

doesn’t cost you a cent, just a click.

not spam srsly guys these puppies make cry

keystonecougar:

wearemagnetised:

hamandheroin:

The Animal Rescue Site is having trouble getting enough people to click on it daily so they can meet their quota of getting FREE FOOD donated every day to abused and neglected animals in their shelters.

It takes less than a minute (only about 15 seconds actually) to go to their site and click on the purple box titled, ‘Click Here to Give - it’s FREE!’. Every click gives about .6 bowls of food to sheltered dogs. You can also click daily!

Keep in mind that this does not cost you a thing. Their corporate sponsors/advertisers use the number of daily visits to donate food to abandoned/neglected animals in exchange for advertising. [via.]

Go to the website here.

doesn’t cost you a cent, just a click.

not spam srsly guys these puppies make cry

Tagged: animals

Source: hamandheroin

6th January 2013

Photo reblogged from What have you got to be afraid of? with 3,922 notes

Tagged: owlscuteanimals

Source: weheartit.com

22nd December 2012

Post reblogged from Ice cream and waffle irons with 131,870 notes

ineloquentformalities:

what-my-dreams-are-made-of:

madehimsaycomfychairs:

i was talking to my boyfriend

and i was trying to describe a type of marine animal

but i couldn’t think of it’s name 

so i said ‘sea pancake’ 

manta ray.

manta ray is the word i was looking for.

image

SCREEEEECH

Tagged: cutePFFFFFBTanimals

Source: madehimsaycomfychairs

20th December 2012

Photo reblogged from The Randomness of a Teenage Wannabe Chef.. with 173,231 notes

fuckyeahinterspeciesfriendships:


My sister has a bearded dragon and they typically eat crickets, but they’ll eat mice occasionally as well. She bought this mouse a week ago and the first day, the bearded dragon put the mouse in his mouth and the mouse squeaked so he spit it out… and he’s never tried to eat it again! Now they’re friends and the mouse sleeps on his back and head and even moved some wood chips over to where the bearded dragon sleeps so he would have a bed too! It’s so cute. 
(I think I died at the cuteness of this! I’d love to give my beardie a mouse friend. He’d probably just eat it though, lol.)

fuckyeahinterspeciesfriendships:

My sister has a bearded dragon and they typically eat crickets, but they’ll eat mice occasionally as well. She bought this mouse a week ago and the first day, the bearded dragon put the mouse in his mouth and the mouse squeaked so he spit it out… and he’s never tried to eat it again! Now they’re friends and the mouse sleeps on his back and head and even moved some wood chips over to where the bearded dragon sleeps so he would have a bed too! It’s so cute. 

(I think I died at the cuteness of this! I’d love to give my beardie a mouse friend. He’d probably just eat it though, lol.)

Tagged: animalssubmission

Source: fuckyeahinterspeciesfriendships

14th December 2012

Photoset reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart with 1,355 notes

jtotheizzoe:

When do we stop seeing the animal, and start seeing ourselves?

Photographer Tim Flach challenges you with that question, in his new book More Than Human. Every single one of his photos, from scary bats to naked chickens, is breathtaking. 

We are becoming aware of more examples of animal intelligence, from the language of whales to the self-awareness and empathy of the great apes. Whereas one’s emotional response to what appears to be a ponderous panda used to be thought of as folly, we are now able to appreciate a wider spectrum of animal thought and processing.

It does not mean that there is deep thought in those eyes, but it blurs the lines of where our stare stops and theirs begins.There is something. What? Who knows?

We would do well to remind ourselves not where animals are like us, but perhaps where we are like them. These photos do that for me. 

See more at Brain Pickings.

Tagged: biologyanimalspandaspsychology

22nd November 2012

Photoset reblogged from The Randomness of a Teenage Wannabe Chef.. with 11,312 notes

sosuperawesome:

TADA’s Revolution

Tagged: artanimals

Source: sosuperawesome