A healthy mix of philosophical awe and ridiculous humor~

This blog contains the following (Click each for the link!):

#SCIENCE

#Food

#Cute Stuff

#Funny Stuff

#Art

#Music

#Cats

#Pandas

#GLBT

#Doctor Who

#Sherlock

#Homestuck

And anything else that catches my eye ;D

About Me:

James, 23, Oklahoma, Clinical Lab Chemistry Tech, Part-Time Panda

11th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Soft Soft Silver Bang with 83,008 notes

igotseizures:

who-let-the-daleks-out:

thenerdgirlcometh:

I actually believe artists and scientists think very similarly. Complex, abstract thought? They both have that down. It’s all about where that thinking takes you after that.

Words cannot describe how much I love this post.

I hope to one day marry my two loves of science and art. I’m so happy to be one step closer.

This is why I’m attracted to artists. They see a side of reality that is similar in passion but unique in vision. Science and art complete each other!

Tagged: scienceartlove

Source: youtube.com

9th April 2014

Post reblogged from Dr. Cranquis' Mumbled Gripes with 408 notes

"I think you’ll understand…"

cranquis:

futuredoctorweirdo:

About a year ago, I was slogging through gross anatomy. My long-time followers (hello, Parents! *wave* ) will recall that I mostly did not love cadaver lab. I valued it. I learned from it. I appreciated it. But I found it really emotionally challenging, much more so than I expected to. I didn’t mind being around dead bodies, but I very much minded tearing them apart. 

I was thinking the other day, though, about a moment that I don’t recall sharing with anybody. It’s one of the things from last year that pops into my head from time to time and makes me smile. 

Towards the end of the year we finished up with dissection of the extremeties, and I actually enjoyed hand and arm dissection a lot. Hands are really lovely little machines, and I found them to be beautiful beneath the skin. I mostly avoided being in the lab by myself — it just didn’t seem healthy! — but I’m an early riser and I needed to get some studying in at one point when nobody else was there. I was working on my cadaver’s forearm, and I found myself holding her still-intact hand to steady her arm. It was cold, of course, but I realized nonetheless that I was holding a person’s hand.

I stopped for a second and looked at her hand in mine, and thought about everything that she must have done with that hand. The lovers she had touched, the babies she had held, the meals she had prepared, the flowers she had picked, the tears she had wiped from her face…and I realized that I was the last person who would get to hold her hand. And I smiled, and I cried. 

Shortly thereafter, I dissected that hand. Not long after that, we finished learning from her, and she was cremated. But before those things happened, I held her hand. I wish I could tell the last person who held it while she was alive that I appreciated her.  

^^ Why I want to donate my body to a medical school.

Beautiful post.

I was REALLY nervous about dissecting a cadaver too, especially since I’d pass out when I would try to donate blood. I also used to get elevated blood pressure just from simply being at the doctor’s office. Anyway, the first day of being around a cadaver, it just all started to sink in how she used to be a person with a family, friends, loves, passions, hobbies, interests, etc… and now she’s just lying there on the table, a bodily remnant of a person.

I actually started really enjoying being able to dissect and learn a body like no other, and so thankful that this person made it possible for so many students. It made me question a lot of things about myself. At the time I was losing interest in a pharmacy career, and wondered if I should’ve done better in my classes to be able to go to med school. I thought it strange that here I was more interested in chemistry, but I was excited about cadaver lab, way more than any of the nursing students. I later realized that I just didn’t have the guts to do stuff like that with living people. It all was okay with a cadaver since I couldn’t hurt them, and honestly, it doesn’t even resemble a person when you work with a cadaver. But still, I’ll never forget the lessons that I learned from her.

Tagged: cadavermedicinescienceanatomy

Source: futuredoctorweirdo

25th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Memewhore with 154,041 notes

zarggg:

respectmethugtoninatalia:

mr-platypus:

premiumgifs:

Liquid being placed on a hydrophobic material causing it to keep its shape.

Sometimes science makes me really angry. 

this is bothering me

This is amazing.

zarggg:

respectmethugtoninatalia:

mr-platypus:

premiumgifs:

Liquid being placed on a hydrophobic material causing it to keep its shape.

Sometimes science makes me really angry. 

this is bothering me

This is amazing.

Tagged: science

Source: thatscienceguy

19th March 2014

Video reblogged from Memewhore with 116 notes

shinywen:

(March 17, 2014) Today is a great day for science, humanity and Andrei Dmitriyevich Linde—one of the main authors of the inflationary universe theory that was confirmed today. Watch his emotions as assistant Professor Chao-Lin Kuo surprises him with the news of the evidence that supports a whole life of theoretical work.

Tagged: science

Source: Gizmodo

19th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from Memewhore with 5,163 notes

skunkbear:

Yesterday there was some big news in the world of physics - scientists detected evidence of “cosmic inflation” - the first exciting moments of the Big Bang. 

Cosmic inflation was first described by Andrei Linde and his colleagues in 1983. The new evidence — called the “Holy Grail” and “missing link” of cosmology” —vindicates Linde’s work. Stanford University shared this video of Linde hearing the news.

Chao-Lin Kuo, one of the physicists behind the new discovery, surprised Linde at his home.

"Renata [Linde’s wife] tells me, ‘It’s probably a delivery - did you order anything?’" Linde said. "Yeah — I ordered it 30 years ago and it finally arrived."

Tagged: science

Source: skunkbear

18th March 2014

Photo reblogged from FUTUREJAM with 195 notes

alexob:

Wanna bet?
Professor Hawking won his bet with director of the Perimeter Institute in Canada Neil Turok after wagering that gravitational waves from the first fleeting moments after the big bang would be detected. 
Turok is said to be needing more evidence before conceding the bet. He said the bet rested on results from the European Space Agency’s Planck space telescope, which last year failed to spot any signs of gravitational waves.
Hawking is well known for making bets with other scientists. He recently lost $100 to Gordon Kane at the University of Michigan after betting that scientists at Cern, home of the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, would not find the Higgs boson. They discovered the particle in July 2012.

alexob:

Wanna bet?

Professor Hawking won his bet with director of the Perimeter Institute in Canada Neil Turok after wagering that gravitational waves from the first fleeting moments after the big bang would be detected. 

Turok is said to be needing more evidence before conceding the bet. He said the bet rested on results from the European Space Agency’s Planck space telescope, which last year failed to spot any signs of gravitational waves.

Hawking is well known for making bets with other scientists. He recently lost $100 to Gordon Kane at the University of Michigan after betting that scientists at Cern, home of the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, would not find the Higgs boson. They discovered the particle in July 2012.

Tagged: science

8th March 2014

Post reblogged from #WHATSHOULDWECALLGRADSCHOOL with 474 notes

TRYING TO UNDERSTAND MY DATA

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

credit: uba

Tagged: scienceDoctor Who

7th March 2014

Photo reblogged from The Randomness of a Teenage Wannabe Chef.. with 79,612 notes

bnaz:

carol1st:

astrodidact:

Yay?….
It’s alive! Buried deep in the Siberian permafrost scientists found a ‘giant virus’ that has been asleep for 30,000 years. Named Pithovirus sibericum, it contains 500 genes and was revived in the lab. The researchers are now trying to assess if ancient viruses such as this one could pose a threat for humans. via Science Alert/fb
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/03/140303-giant-virus-permafrost-siberia-pithovirus-pandoravirus-science/

Let’s hope this wasn’t the stupidest thing we’ve ever done.

there are about 16046540210 movies that explain exactly why this could be the stupidest thing we’ve ever done

bnaz:

carol1st:

astrodidact:

Yay?….

It’s alive! Buried deep in the Siberian permafrost scientists found a ‘giant virus’ that has been asleep for 30,000 years. Named Pithovirus sibericum, it contains 500 genes and was revived in the lab. The researchers are now trying to assess if ancient viruses such as this one could pose a threat for humans. via Science Alert/fb

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/03/140303-giant-virus-permafrost-siberia-pithovirus-pandoravirus-science/

Let’s hope this wasn’t the stupidest thing we’ve ever done.

there are about 16046540210 movies that explain exactly why this could be the stupidest thing we’ve ever done

Tagged: science

Source: astrodidact

7th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from Quantumaniac with 3,753 notes

zerostatereflex:

The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang

A beautifully animated description of what we know about the creation of the Universe, so far.
We can see most of the how, though who knows how long this can last. Does the universe build in enough time for the beings that study it, to reveal why it happened? We’ll see I guess. :D

Tagged: scienceastrophysics

Source: zerostatereflex

6th March 2014

Photo reblogged from And So Our Story Begins... with 64,279 notes

jumpingjacktrash:

nekomcevil:

gelunnucifera:

callan-the-misandrist:

positive-press-daily:

This lamp absorbs 150 times more CO2 than a tree

It’s still in the “so crazy it just might work” stage, but these microalgae-powered lamps, invented by French biochemist Pierre Calleja, could absorb a ton of carbon from the air every year. That’s as much as 150 to 200 trees. [x]


NEAT

YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND. This is ingenious.
The design is a light bulb surrounded by a glass casing. The glass is filled with (water based) media and microalgae. The top is permeable to gasses so that gas exchange can occur. All of the wiring is linked to the grid underground.
Since the light source is inside, it gets scattered and “dimmed” by the water and algae. This makes it less glaringly bright and scatters the light wider, which is good for a street light. It is not longer white light as well, which helps make it easier on the eyes while still providing light.
At the same time, it provides the light for photosynthesis in the algae, so they are continuously exchanging CO2 for O2, not just in the day. It also provides a source of heat, which helps keep the algae from going dormant during cold weather (as in the snowy picture above).
And notice how I did not specify permeability - that’s because NOx’s (NO and NO2) are also permeable and can be used as nitrogen sources to microalgae. In fact, algae are relatively low maintenance. As autotrophs, they don’t require super complex media, not does it really need to be changed/added to. (I’m actually fairly certain that there would still be algae in these tanks a year later; it may need to be cleaned or something, but there would be some living algae.)



and they’re so pretty too

jumpingjacktrash:

nekomcevil:

gelunnucifera:

callan-the-misandrist:

positive-press-daily:

This lamp absorbs 150 times more CO2 than a tree

It’s still in the “so crazy it just might work” stage, but these microalgae-powered lamps, invented by French biochemist Pierre Calleja, could absorb a ton of carbon from the air every year. That’s as much as 150 to 200 trees. [x]

NEAT

YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND. This is ingenious.

The design is a light bulb surrounded by a glass casing. The glass is filled with (water based) media and microalgae. The top is permeable to gasses so that gas exchange can occur. All of the wiring is linked to the grid underground.

Since the light source is inside, it gets scattered and “dimmed” by the water and algae. This makes it less glaringly bright and scatters the light wider, which is good for a street light. It is not longer white light as well, which helps make it easier on the eyes while still providing light.

At the same time, it provides the light for photosynthesis in the algae, so they are continuously exchanging CO2 for O2, not just in the day. It also provides a source of heat, which helps keep the algae from going dormant during cold weather (as in the snowy picture above).

And notice how I did not specify permeability - that’s because NOx’s (NO and NO2) are also permeable and can be used as nitrogen sources to microalgae. In fact, algae are relatively low maintenance. As autotrophs, they don’t require super complex media, not does it really need to be changed/added to. (I’m actually fairly certain that there would still be algae in these tanks a year later; it may need to be cleaned or something, but there would be some living algae.)

and they’re so pretty too

Tagged: sciencetechneatbiology

Source: exclusively-positive-press

24th February 2014

Photoset reblogged from Ice cream and waffle irons with 987,420 notes

anotherfirebender:

m1ssred:

chemical reaction

*how to spawn demons: a beginner’s guide to chemistry

Tagged: chemistryscience

Source: m1ssred

18th February 2014

Quote reblogged from The Randomness of a Teenage Wannabe Chef.. with 5,027 notes

It is important for scientists to be aware of what our discoveries mean, socially and politically. It’s a noble goal that science should be apolitical, acultural, and asocial, but it can’t be, because it’s done by people who are all those things.

 Mae Jemison, the first black woman in space. 

MAE JEMISON SPEAKS TRUTH

(via coolchicksfromhistory)

Tagged: science

Source: books.google.com

18th February 2014

Photoset reblogged from Memewhore with 2,293 notes

sagansense:

spaceplasma:

Binary star

A binary star is a star system consisting of two stars orbiting around their common center of mass. The brighter star is called the primary and the other is its companion star or secondary.

Binary stars are often detected optically, in which case they are called visual binaries. Many visual binaries have long orbital periods of several centuries or millennia and therefore have orbits which are uncertain or poorly known. They may also be detected by indirect techniques, such as spectroscopy (spectroscopic binaries) or astrometry (astrometric binaries). If a binary star happens to orbit in a plane along our line of sight, its components will eclipse and transit each other; these pairs are called eclipsing binaries, or, as they are detected by their changes in brightness during eclipses and transits, photometric binaries.

The first GIF shows an artist’s impression of an eclipsing binary star system. As the two stars orbit each other they pass in front of one another and their combined brightness, seen from a distance, decreases. 

Algol, known colloquially as the Demon Star, is a bright star in the constellation Perseus. It is one of the best known eclipsing binaries, (2nd GIF) although Algol is actually a three-star system (Beta Persei A, B, and C) in which the large and bright primary Beta Persei A is regularly eclipsed by the dimmer Beta Persei B.

The second animation was assembled from 55 images of the CHARA interferometer in the near-infrared H-band, sorted according to orbital phase.

Image credit: ESO/CHARA

Tagged: scienceastrophysics

Source: spaceplasma

11th February 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Randomness of a Teenage Wannabe Chef.. with 19,326 notes

theashblaster:

shiramiremii:

cunicular:

FUCK

I read the entire thing and now I’m crying and paranoid as fuck

Absolutely amazing read omg

Tagged: historymedicinescience

Source: appropriately-inappropriate

7th February 2014

Photo reblogged from The Randomness of a Teenage Wannabe Chef.. with 28,612 notes

propergoodlike:

look at this shit eating grin. this man thinks he has posed an unanswerable question to evolutionary biologists that will shake the very foundation of the theory of evolution to its core when any 14-year-old can tell you that we literally did not evolve from monkeys. amazing

propergoodlike:

look at this shit eating grin. this man thinks he has posed an unanswerable question to evolutionary biologists that will shake the very foundation of the theory of evolution to its core when any 14-year-old can tell you that we literally did not evolve from monkeys. amazing

Tagged: PFFFFFBTscience

Source: propergoodlike